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Colonoscopy-assisted percutaneous sigmoidopexy (CAPS) for complete rectal prolapse treatment: Case series.

Background and study aims We have previously reported on the effectiveness of colonoscopy-assisted percutaneous sigmoidopexy (CAPS) for sigmoid volvulus treatment. This study describes the CAPS application to treat complete rectal prolapse by straightening and fixing the rectum. Complete rectal prolapse is common in older women. Due to their comorbidities, management must comprise a simple, safe, and reliable surgical method not involving general anesthesia or colon resection. Patients and methods We enrolled 13 patients in our outpatient department diagnosed with complete rectal prolapse between June 2016 and 2021. The endoscope was advanced into the anterior proximal rectal wall, straightening the intussuscepted sigmoid colon and rectum to approximate the puncture site. The fixation sites were anesthetized with 1% xylocaine, and a 2-mm skin incision was made using a scalpel. A two-shot anchor was used to fix the sigmoid colon to the abdominal wall (Olympus, Tokyo, Japan). Results The median patient age was 88 years (range: 50-94). The median CAPS procedure time was 30 minutes (range: 20-60). In one patient, the transverse colon was accidentally punctured and interposed between the abdominal wall and sigmoid colon, requiring a laparotomy to remove the causative fixation thread and provide re-fixation. Fecal incontinence was resolved in 10 of 13 cases. Conclusions CAPS is a quick and simple procedure. In addition, it is a treatment option for complete rectal prolapse that can be performed under local anesthesia.

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