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Lysophospholipase D from Thermocrispum limits psoriatic inflammation by hydrolyzing epidermal lysoplasmalogen produced by group IIF secreted phospholipase A 2 .

Biochimie 2023 October 5
Epidermal lipids play important roles in skin homeostasis and diseases. Psoriasis is an inflammatory disease characterized by keratinocyte hyperproliferation and Th17 immune responses. We previously reported that ethanolamine-type lysoplasmalogen (P-LPE), preferentially produced by group IIF secreted PLA2 (sPLA2 -IIF/PLA2G2F) that is expressed in the suprabasal epidermis, promotes epidermal hyperplasia in psoriatic inflammation. Herein, we show that forcible degradation of epidermal P-LPE by topical application of recombinant lysophospholipase D (LyPls-PLD) from Thermocrispum, a lysoplasmalogen-specific hydrolase, attenuated epidermal hyperplasia and inflammation in imiquimod-induced and K5.Stat3C-transgenic mouse psoriasis models. In humans, P-LPE levels were elevated in the tape-stripped stratum corneum of patients with psoriasis. Moreover, in primary cultured human epidermal keratinocytes, aberrant cell proliferation and activation by psoriatic cytokines were sPLA2 -IIF/P-LPE-dependent and were suppressed by the addition of LyPls-PLD with a decrease in P-LPE. These findings confirm that the sPLA2 -IIF/P-LPE axis in the epidermis indeed regulates psoriasis, that P-LPE is a lipid biomarker that predicts the severity of psoriasis, and that pharmacological removal of this bioactive lipid is useful to prevent the disease. Thus, our study may lead to the development of drug discovery and diagnostic techniques based on this pathway.

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