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Impaired artery elasticity predicts cardiovascular morbidity and mortality- A longitudinal study in the Vara-Skövde Cohort.

It is still debated whether arterial elasticity provides prognostic information for cardiovascular risk beyond blood pressure measurements in a healthy population. To investigate the association between arterial elasticity obtained by radial artery pulse wave analysis and risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in men and women. In 2002-2005, 2362 individuals (men=1186, 50.2%) not taking antihypertensive medication were included. C2 (small artery elasticity) was measured using the HDI/Pulse Wave CR2000. Data on acute myocardial infarction or stroke, fatal or non-fatal, was obtained between 2002-2019. Cox- regression was used to investigate associations between C2 and future CVD, adjusting for confounding factors such as age, sex, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, HOMA-IR (Homeostatic Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance), LDL- cholesterol, CRP (C-Reactive Protein), alcohol consumption, smoking and physical activity. At baseline, the mean age of 46 ± 10.6 years and over the follow-up period, we observed 108 events 70 events in men [event rate: 5.9%], 38 in women [event rate: 3.2%]. In the fully adjusted model, and for each quartile decrease in C2, there was a significant increase in the risk for incident CVD by 36%. (HR = 1.36, 95% CI: 1.01-1.82, p = 0.041). The results were accentuated for all men (HR = 1.74, 95% CI: 1.21-2.50, p = 0.003) and women over the age of 50 years (HR = 1.70, 95% CI: 0.69-4.20). We showed a strong and independent association between C2 and CVD in men. In women after menopause, similar tendencies and effect sizes were observed.

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