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Association between Metabolic Syndrome Risk Factors and Immunohistochemical Profile in Women with Breast Cancer.

BACKGROUND: The association between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and breast cancer may significantly impact the mortality and incidence of breast cancer. This study aimed to assess the association between MetS risk factors and immunohistochemical (IHC) profiles in women with breast cancer.

METHODS: This cross-sectional study used the medical records of 300 breast cancer patients with an average age of 53.11±12.97 years in the Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy Clinic of Dr. Anbiai, Tehran, Iran (2020-2021). The cases were divided into five subgroups including luminal A, luminal B (HER-2- ), luminal B (HER-2+ ), HER-2 overexpressing, and triple negative.

RESULTS: There was no difference in the prognostic indicators between the presence and absence of MetS in women with breast cancer. A higher proportion of luminal A tumors (39.3%), luminal B (HER-2+ ) (25%), triple-negative (17%), luminal B (HER-2- ) (10.7%), HER-2 overexpression (8%) was observed in women with MetS than those without MetS. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that patients with MetS had a 41% higher chance of developing luminal A than those without MetS, and patients with a BMI≥30 Kg/m2 had an 80% higher chance of developing luminal B (HER-2+ ) than those with a BMI<30 Kg/m2 . Moreover, women with a waist circumference higher than 88 cm had a 14 % lower chance of developing Luminal B (HER-2+ ) than those with a waist circumference less than 88 cm.

CONCLUSION: There was no difference in prognostic indicators and IHC profile in patients with and without MetS.

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