Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Maternal smoking during pregnancy links to childhood blood pressure through birth weight and body mass index: NHANES 1999-2018.

Maternal smoking during pregnancy (MSDP) is associated with lower birth weight, childhood obesity, and elevated blood pressure (BP) in offspring. We aimed to examine whether birth weight and body mass index (BMI) mediate the effect of MSDP on BP in children. The study included 14,713 children aged 8 to 15 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys from 1999 to 2018. General third-variable models were used to examine the mediating effects of birth weight and BMI on the association of MSDP with BP. A total of 1928 (13.1%) children were exposed to MSDP. MSDP was associated with reduced birth weight (p < 0.001), increased BMI (p < 0.001), and elevated systolic BP (p = 0.005). MSDP was not associated with systolic BP after adjustment for birth weight and BMI z-score (p = 0.875), with 95.0% of the effect of MSDP on BP mediated by birth weight (39.1%) and BMI (55.9%). In conclusion, lower birth weight and increased obesity measures mediate the adverse effects of MSDP on BP in children. These findings provide novel mechanistic insight into the adverse effect of MSDP on BP in children and have implications for preventing hypertension in later life.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app