Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Endocarditis due to Candida albicans in an immunocompromised patient: A case report.

BACKGROUND: Fungal endocarditis is a low-frequency disease with a challenging diagnosis, as it can be mistaken with bacterial endocarditis. Fungal endocarditis causes higher mortality rates in immunocompromised patients. In the clinical practice, the endocarditis caused by fungi represents up to 10% of all infectious endocarditis cases and has a mortality rate of nearly 50%.

CASE REPORT: Here we present the case of a 53-year-old woman under corticosteroid therapy with a history of rheumatic heart disease, aortic valve replacement, and rheumatoid arthritis, who presented with fungal endocarditis caused by Candida albicans. Even though the patient received 3 years of antifungal prophylaxis with fluconazole, had valve replacement surgery, and received intensive care, the patient finally worsened and died.

CONCLUSIONS: Comorbidities and corticosteroid therapy predisposed the patient to acquire fungal endocarditis. This case highlights the importance of implementing procedures for the isolation and identification of fungi, and for carrying out antifungal-susceptibility testing, as well as establishing surveillance programs to identify infection-causing species and drug resistance patterns in hospitals. Moreover, designing and upgrading the algorithm for infectious endocarditis is the key to future improvements in diagnosis.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app