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Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Is Not a Major Determinant of High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Levels in People Without Known Diabetes Mellitus.

Background: It has been well established that high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is strongly associated with obesity, insulin resistance, high blood pressure, and dyslipidemia. However, the effects of different lipid parameters on hs-CRP levels are less deliberated. The purpose of the study was to compare the relative contribution of triglycerides (TGs), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) to the levels of hs-CRP. Methods: Three hundred seventy-eight subjects without known history of diabetes were recruited for the study. No concomitant antilipid or antidiabetes agents were allowed. Each subject received anthropometric measurements, fasting sampling for lipid profile and hs-CRP, and a 75-gram oral glucose tolerance test for the measurements of insulin resistance (surrogated by insulin sensitivity index ISI0,120 ). Results: Levels of hs-CRP levels were positively correlated with Log (TG) and negatively correlated with HDL-C in partial correlation after adjustments for confounding variables, but not with LDL-C. The hs-CRP levels in the three groups by tertiles of LDL-C were similar. Subsequently, we found that body mass index (first step), Log (ISI0,120 ) (second step), and Log (TG) (third step) independently predicted the variance of Log (hs-CRP) in stepwise multiple regression. However, both HDL-C and LDL-C failed to be entered into the models to explain Log (hs-CRP). Conclusions: Our data demonstrated that Log (TG) was a major lipid determinant of hs-CRP levels. The contribution of LDL-C to the levels of hs-CRP might be insignificant.

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