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Clinical Characteristics and Genotyping of Pediatric Adenovirus Pneumonia Disease and Coinfection in Southeast China.

Introduction: Human adenovirus (HAdV) is a common pathogen that can cause acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in children. Adenovirus pneumonia is the most severe respiratory disease associated with HAdV. Objective: We aimed to investigate the clinical characteristics of children hospitalized with adenovirus pneumonia in Quanzhou, China, in 2019. We also sought to determine the viral genotype in these cases and explore cases associated with severe adenovirus pneumonia. Methods: We collected oropharyngeal swabs from 99 children who were hospitalized with pneumonia in Quanzhou Women and Children's Hospital, these samples were tested for the presence of HAdV. Genotyping of the viruses was performed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Logistic regression analysis was employed to analyze risk factors related to severe adenovirus pneumonia. The epidemiological data were examined using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences software (SPSS). Results: Among the 99 patients in our study, the median age was 21 months. We observed a 4% mortality rate among those diagnosed with adenovirus pneumonia. Adenovirus pneumonia often presents as a coinfection. Lactate dehydrogenase and neutrophil percentages of WBC's were significantly increased in patients with severe adenovirus pneumonia compared with mild HAdV disease. The predominant viral genotypes identified were type 3 and type 7. Conclusions: In the Quanzhou area of southeast China, the incidence of adenovirus pneumonia was found to be high among children younger than two years old. Type 7 HAdV was identified as the primary pathogen. A long duration of fever, dyspnea and digestive system complications were risk factors for severe adenovirus pneumonia after HAdV infection. Clinical Trial Registration number: ChiCTR2200062358.

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