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Association of Apolipoprotein A5 Gene Variants with Hyperlipidemic Acute Pancreatitis in Southeastern China.

Background: Apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) is involved in serum triglyceride (TG) regulation. Several studies have reported that the rs651821 locus in the APOA5 gene is associated with serum TG levels in the Chinese population. However, no research has been performed regarding the association between the variants of rs651821 and the risk of hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis (HLAP). Methods: A case-control study was conducted and is reported following the STROBE guidelines. We enrolled a total of 88 participants in this study (60 HLAP patients and 28 controls). APOA5 was genotyped using PCR and Sanger sequencing. Logistic regression models were conducted to calculate odds ratios and a 95% confidence interval. Results: The genotype distribution of the rs651821 alleles in both groups follow the Hardy-Weinberg distribution. The frequency of the "C" allele in rs651821 was increased in HLAP patients compared to controls. In the recessive model, subjects with the "CC" genotype had an 8.217-fold higher risk for HLAP (OR = 8.217, 95% CI: 1.023-66.01, p  = 0.046) than subjects with the "TC+TT" genotypes. After adjusting for sex, the association remained significant (OR = 9.898, 95% CI: 1.176-83.344, p  = 0.035). Additionally, the "CC" genotype was related to an increased TG/apolipoprotein B (APOB) ratio and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the C allele of rs651821 in APOA5 increases the risk of HLAP in persons from Southeastern China.

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