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Prognostic Value of Admission Neutrophil Count in Asthma Patients with COVID-19: A Comparative Analysis with other Systemic Inflammation Indices for In-Hospital Mortality Prediction.

Despite studies indicating that asthma patients do not exhibit a higher mortality rate or severity compared to the general population when infected with COVID-19, there have been few reports on predictive factors for mortality in this context. This study aimed to assess the predictive value of systemic inflammation indices including neutrophil-to-lymphocyte (NLR), monocyte-to-lymphocyte (MLR), platelet-to-lymphocyte (PLR), systemic inflammation response index (SIR-I), and systemic inflammation index (SII) in determining mortality rate among patients with COVID-19 and asthma. In this prospective study, the laboratory parameters of 1792 COVID-19 patients were examined, with a subgroup consisting of 112 patients with asthma and 1680 patients without asthma. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was employed to assess the potential of inflammatory indices in indicating COVID-19 severity, while Kaplan-Meier curves were utilized to analyze the survival probability with death as the outcome. In deceased non-asthma patients, the levels of leukocyte and differential cell counts, and the values of PLR, NLR, MLR, SII, and SIR-I were higher than in survivors. In contrast, all the above values except PLR and MLR were significant in the asthma groups. The Kaplan-Meier survival curves were consistent with the ROC analysis. However, a multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that neutrophil counts in non-asthma subjects and leukocyte and neutrophil counts in asthma patients remained significant for survival. In conclusion, while numerous inflammatory indices were associated with mortality in COVID-19 patients without asthma, neutrophil counts could independently predict mortality risk in asthma COVID-19 patients.

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