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Associations of body roundness index with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality: NHANES 2001-2018.

Body roundness index (BRI) was associated with cardiovascular diseases. But the relationship between BRI with cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality and all-cause mortality remains largely unknown in hypertensive patients. This prospective cohort study included patients with hypertension who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2001 through 2018, and aimed to evaluate the association between BRI with CVD mortality and all-cause mortality. A total of 15570 patients were included. Over a median follow-up of 8.0 years (interquartile range, 4.3-12.6 years), 3445 individuals died, including 1166 CVD deaths. Weighted restricted cubic spline regression results showed a nonlinear association between BRI and CVD mortality and all-cause mortality (both P for nonlinear trend <0.001). The weighted multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression showed the hazard ratio (HRs) for CVD mortality were 0.93 (95% CI: 0.84-1.03, P = 0.160) in the low levels of BRI (≤5.9) and 1.11 (95% CI: 1.05-1.19, P < 0.001) in the high levels of BRI (>5.9). Similar associations were observed for all-cause mortality, the HRs were 0.91 (95% CI: 0.87-0.96, P < 0.001) in the low levels of BRI (≤6.3) and 1.09 (95% CI: 1.05-1.13, P < 0.001) in the high levels of BRI (>6.3). This cohort study supported that BRI was nonlinearly associated with CVD mortality and all-cause mortality among patients with hypertension. The thresholds of 5.9 and 6.3 for CVD mortality and all-cause mortality, respectively, may represent intervention targets for lowering the risk of premature death, but this needs to be confirmed in large clinical trials.

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