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Characteristics of Changes in Intrathecal Baclofen Dosage over Time due to Causative Disease.

Intrathecal baclofen (ITB) therapy effectively treats spasticity caused by brain or spinal cord lesions. However, only a few studies compare the course of treatment for different diseases. We investigated the change in daily dose of baclofen per year and its associated adverse events in patients presenting with the three most common etiologies at our institute: hereditary spastic paraplegia, cerebral palsy, and spinal cord injury. The ITB pumps were implanted from July 2007 to August 2019, with a mean follow-up period of 70 months. In patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia, baclofen dosage was reduced after eight years following ITB introduction, and the treatment was terminated in one patient owing to disease progression. In patients with cerebral palsy, the dosage increased gradually, and became constant in the 11th year. Patients with spinal cord injury gradually increased their baclofen dosage throughout the entire observation period. Severity and adverse event rates were higher in patients with cerebral palsy than in others. The degree and progression of spasticity varied depending on the causative disease. Understanding the characteristics and natural history of each disease is important when continuing ITB treatment.

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