JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Comparison of mini-simple limbal epithelial transplantation and conjunctival-limbal autograft for the treatment of primary pterygium: a randomised controlled trial.

PURPOSE: The purpose of this double-masked, parallel randomised controlled trial was to compare the recurrence rate and other outcomes between conjunctival-limbal autograft (CLAu) and mini-simple limbal epithelial transplantation (mini-SLET) after excision of pterygium.

METHODS: Eligibility criteria for participants was the presence of a primary nasal pterygium extending equally to or greater than two millimetres on the cornea on its horizontal axis from the nasal limbus. The participants were allocated into two groups (CLAu and mini-SLET) using simple randomisation with a table of random numbers. Participants and the outcome assessor were masked to the intervention. The study protocol is listed and available on https://clinicaltrials.gov (Identifier: NCT03363282).

RESULTS: A total of 61 eyes were enrolled in the study, 33 underwent CLAu (group 1) and 28 mini-SLET (group 2), all eyes were analysed in each group. At 2, 3, 6 and 12 months the CLAu group exhibited a recurrence of 0%, 6.1%, 8.1% and 8.1%, while the mini-SLET exhibited a recurrence of 0%, 17.9%, 50% and 53.5% (p<0.05). There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications in either of the two groups.

CONCLUSION: The findings of this study suggest that mini-SLET has a higher recurrence rate and provides no advantage over CLAu in the treatment of primary pterygium.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app