Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Endophthalmitis rates and risk factors following intraocular surgeries in the medicare population from 2016 to 2019.

AIMS: To determine endophthalmitis rates and risk factors following intraocular surgeries in the Medicare population.

METHODS: Retrospective, cross-sectional study from 2016 to 2019 in Medicare fee-for-service and Medicare Advantage beneficiaries. 100% Medicare claims were used to identify eyes that underwent intraocular surgery. Exclusion criteria included eyes that had intraocular surgery 42 days before or after and eyes in patients with a history of endophthalmitis within 12 months.

RESULTS: 9 744 400 intraocular surgeries were performed among Medicare beneficiaries from 2016 to 2019. A 42-day postoperative endophthalmitis rate was 0.09%. Endophthalmitis rate by surgery type was 0.43% for corneal transplant, 0.36% for secondary intraocular lens (IOL), 0.24% for retina, 0.16% for glaucoma, 0.11% for cataract combined with other procedures and 0.08% for cataract surgeries alone. On multivariable analysis, the risk of endophthalmitis was increased for all intraocular surgery types when compared with cataract surgeries; adjusted OR (aOR) 5.30 (p<0.01) for corneal transplant, aOR 4.50 (p<0.01) for secondary IOL, aOR 3.00 (p<0.01) for retina, aOR 1.93 (p<0.01) for glaucoma, aOR 1.45 (p<0.01) for combined cataract surgeries. Increased risk of developing endophthalmitis was associated with older age (≥85 vs 65-75 years: aOR 1.36; p<0.01), male sex (aOR 1.20; p<0.001) and greater Charlson Comorbidity Index (≥7 vs 0: aOR 1.79; p<0.01).

CONCLUSIONS: Postoperative endophthalmitis rate after intraocular surgeries was 0.09% between 2016 and 2019 for Medicare beneficiaries. Endophthalmitis rates were highest for corneal transplant surgeries followed by secondary IOL surgeries and lowest for cataract surgeries. Older age, male gender and higher comorbidity index were associated with risk of endophthalmitis.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app