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Impact of Bariatric Surgery on Cardiac Function and Structure in Chinese Patients with Obesity.

Introduction: Obesity contributes to cardiac dysfunction and has an impact on atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Bariatric surgery (BS) is being considered a therapeutic option for patients with obesity and also can improve cardiac function. Very few studies considered the Chinese population. This study aimed to examine the effect of BS on cardiac function and structure in Chinese subjects with obesity. Methods: A single-center retrospective analysis of 143 patients with obesity was included. To observe and analyze the short-term, midterm, and long-term effects of BS on cardiovascular function and structure, the study population was divided into three groups according to the time of review. Fifty-two patients in group T1 (re-examination within 12 months); 53 patients in group T2 (re-examination within 12 to 24 months); and 38 patients in group T3 (re-examination over 24 months). The effects of BS on the cardiac function and structure were evaluated by analyzing the echocardiographic parameters. Results: After BS, body mass index (BMI) decreased from 39.7 ± 8.0 to 28.4 ± 6.4 kg/m2 ( P  < 0.001). Blood pressure decreased significantly. Left ventricular mass index (LVMI) decreased (43.7 ± 16.4 to 37.8 ± 13.4 g/m2.7 , P  < 0.001). The change in LVMI was correlated with the change in BMI ( R 2  = 0.14, P  < 0.001). In subgroup analyses at different follow-ups, echocardiographic parameters showed varying degrees of change compared with the baseline. Conclusions: Significant weight loss by BS was associated with improved left ventricular structure and function in Chinese patients with obesity, suggesting potential favorable effects of BS on the cardiac function and structure.

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