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The Relationship between Allergic Disease and Sexual Dysfunction: A Scoping Review.

INTRODUCTION: Sexual dysfunction (SD) and allergic disease are common health concerns worldwide and bear a potential relationship. This scoping review is conducted to analyze the currently available data regarding the associations between these two health issues.

METHODS: A comprehensive literature search was performed in the databases of PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and Web of Science to retrieve studies that were published before January 2023. A narrative synthesis was conducted to analyze the effects of allergic diseases on SD based on the evaluation of the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) and International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF).

RESULTS: Twelve observational studies were included after the selection process. The results generally suggested lower FSFI or IIEF scores in patients with asthma, allergic rhinitis, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, and urticaria compared to the healthy control groups. The underlying factors of this relationship could be inflammation, psychological factors, hormonal changes, sleep disorders, sexual behavior-related allergic reactions, social economic status, and the use of medications.

CONCLUSION: SD and allergic disease are interrelated based on the extant literature. This scoping review provides insights into the clinical implications of both entities, while more research studies are warranted to further elucidate this complex relationship.

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