JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Effectiveness of mid thoracic spine mobilization on postural balance and gait ability in subacute stroke patients: A randomized clinical trial.

BACKGROUND: Although mulligan sustained natural apophyseal glides (SNAG) and maitland mobilization (MM) are common interventions for musculoskeletal disease, no study has directly compared the effectiveness of mid-thoracic spine mobilization in subacute stroke patients.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of mid-thoracic spine mobilization (SNAG vs. MM) on postural balance and gait ability in subacute stroke patients.

METHODS: Fifty subacute stroke patients were randomly allocated to the SNAG (n= 17), MM (n= 16), and control (n= 17) groups, each receiving a neuro-developmental therapy program for four successive weeks. The SNAG and MM groups additionally received mid-thoracic spine mobilization (T4∼8). The primary outcome measure was postural sway, and secondary outcome measures included the five times sit-to-stand test (FTSST), functional reach test (FRT), 10-m walk test (10MWT), 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and global rating of change (GRC).

RESULTS: Participants reported no adverse events, and there was no loss to follow-up. The SNAG and MM group patients demonstrated significant improvements (p< 0.05) in postural sway, FTSST, FRT, 10MWT, and 6MWT compared with those in the control group, with no between-group differences.

CONCLUSIONS: Mid-thoracic spine mobilization allows significant improvements in postural balance and gait ability in subacute stroke patients, with no differences between the SNAG and MM techniques.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app