Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

The genetics of portal hypertension: Recent developments and the road ahead.

Portal hypertension (PH), defined as a pathological increase in the portal vein pressure, has different aetiologies and causes. Intrahepatic PH is mostly secondary to the presence of underlying liver disease leading to cirrhosis, characterized by parenchymal changes with deregulated accumulation of extracellular matrix and vascular abnormalities; liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and hepatic stellate cells are key players in PH progression, able to influence each other. However, PH may also develop independently of parenchymal damage, as occur in portosinusoidal vascular disorder (PSVD), a group of clinical and histological entities characterized by portal vasculature dysfunctions. In this particular group of disorders, the pathophysiology of PH is still poorly understood. In the last years, several genetic studies, based on genome-wide association studies or whole-exome sequencing analysis, have highlighted the importance of genetic heritability in PH pathogenesis, both in cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic cases. The common PNPLA3 p.I148M variant, one of the main determinants of the susceptibility to steatotic liver disease, has also been associated with decompensation in patients with PH. Genetic variations at loci influencing coagulation, mainly the ABO locus, may directly contribute to the pathogenesis of PH. Rare genetic variants have been associated with familiar cases of progressive PSVD. In this review, we summarize the recent knowledges on genetic variants predisposing to PH development, contributing to better understand the role of genetic factors in PH pathogenesis.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app