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Oxycodone Extended-Release Capsule Utilization for Pain Management in a Cancer Palliative Care Clinic: A Retrospective Review.

ABSTRACT Xtampza ER™, an oxycodone extended-release capsule (OERC), was the first long-acting opioid to feature abuse-deterrent properties and various routes of administration without pharmacokinetic alterations. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate changes in reported pain scores after initiation of or rotation to OERC from a previous opioid.  Baseline scores were from patients' outpatient visits immediately before starting OERC and were compared to those at the next two follow-up visits. Secondary objectives identified variables that influenced pain scores. Methods included screening for cancer patients with outpatient OERC prescriptions seen in the palliative care clinic. Eighty-two charts were reviewed with 66 included. Overall mean pain scores at both follow-ups were lower than those at baseline (-0.7 ± 2.1; -1.1 ± 2.4). Results were statistically significant between first and second-reported pain scores versus baseline ( p  = 0.009; 0.012) but clinically insignificant, defined as a  ≥ 2-point change in numeric pain scores. Most patients discontinued OERC at the first or second follow-up (35; 53%), and 12.1% of patients who started OERC were prescribed OERC at the end of the study. There were no significant variables identified to influence pain scores either statistically or clinically. Further studies are needed to determine the long-term efficacy and safety in cancer palliative-care patients.

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