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Hemodynamic Predictors of Blood Pressure Responsiveness to Continuous Aerobic Training in Postmenopausal Hypertensive Women.

Blood pressure (BP) responses to recommended aerobic training can vary widely between individuals. Although studies demonstrate the role of exercise training in regulating BP responsiveness, predictive models are still unknown. This study aimed to identify hemodynamic predictive markers for the diagnosis of BP responsiveness based on baseline characteristics and postexercise ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) before an aerobic training program in postmenopausal women. Sixty-five postmenopausal women with essential hypertension were randomly allocated into the continuous aerobic training (CAT, n  = 51) and nonexercising control (CON, n  = 14) groups. CAT group cycled at moderate intensity three times a week for 12 weeks. Individuals who failed to decrease systolic blood pressure (SBP) were classified as nonresponders (NRs; n  = 34) based on typical error of measurement. Baseline anthropometric, metabolic, cardiovascular, hemodynamic variables, and postexercise ABP was measured to predict BP responsiveness. A logistic regression model based on Baseline SBP [odds ratio (OR) = 1.202; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.080-1.338], SBP Nighttime (OR = 0.889; 95% CI = 0.811-0.975), and heart rate (HR) Nighttime (OR = 1.127; 95% CI = 1.014-1.254) were able to diagnose responders and NR individuals to BP reduction in response to CAT with 92.6% accuracy ( P  < 0.001; Sensitivity = 94.1%; Specificity = 79.4%). The findings highlight the potential value of baseline clinical characteristics as Baseline SBP, SBP, and HR Nighttime as markers for diagnosing BP responsiveness to recommended CAT in hypertension postmenopausal women. Clinical Trial Registration number: RBR-3xnqxs8.

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