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Serum Endocan Levels in Postmenopausal Women with Metabolic Syndrome.

Aim: Studies that explored endocan (as a novel marker of endothelial dysfunction) in relation to metabolic syndrome (MetS) are scarce and show discordant results. Importantly, no study has yet examined serum endocan levels in exclusively postmenopausal women with MetS and free of diabetes. Oxidative stress and inflammation are the key features of MetS and consequently cardiovascular diseases. Hence, we aimed to explore the potential relationship between endocan, oxidative stress [ i.e., determined by total antioxidant status, total oxidant status, and pro-oxidant/antioxidant balance (PAB)], inflammation, and MetS in a cohort of postmenopausal women. Methods: A total of 126 postmenopausal women were included consecutively. MetS was diagnosed following the International Diabetes Federation criteria. Results: Higher serum endocan levels were found in MetS group as compared with MetS-free counterparts [6.03 (3.47-10.37) pg/mL vs. 2.27 (1.49-3.50) pg/mL, P  < 0.001]. Endocan showed good discriminatory ability toward MetS [area under the curve (AUC) = 0.809]. Besides age, the inclusion of oxidative stress and inflammation biomarkers, such as PAB and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), the AUC for discrimination postmenopausal women with MetS from MetS-free women was 0.845. Conclusion: Postmenopausal women with MetS exhibited almost 2.7 times higher serum endocan level as compared with MetS-free middle-aged women. Endocan showed good discriminatory ability toward MetS and could be a diagnostic marker in MetS. Similar results were confirmed when added an age, oxidative stress, and inflammation biomarkers ( i.e., PAB and hsCRP) were included for the discrimination of postmenopausal with MetS from MetS-free women.

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