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Expectations of Patients and Their Families After the Treatment of Substance Use Disorder.

BACKGROUND: Substance use disorders are economically and socially devastating to families and societies. Expectations of the patients and their families during the posttreatment phase of substance use disorder need to be emphasized to maintain a patient's sobriety and prevent relapse.

AIM: The aim of this study was to examine the prediction power of personal and sociodemographic factors of patients and their families to treatment outcomes.

METHODS: A descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional design was used. Data were collected from 80 patients treated for substance use disorders from a major psychiatric hospital and their family members regarding social, health, and psychological expectations. A three-step multiple hierarchical regression analysis was used to predict the power of personal and sociodemographic characteristics of patients' and their families' expectations to treatment outcomes.

RESULTS: Heroin use, codeine use, family education, and family support were significant predictors of rehabilitation expectation ( p < .05). Level of education and heroin use were predictors for lower levels of rehabilitation expectation, whereas family support and codeine use were indicators for higher scores of rehabilitation expectation.

CONCLUSION: Emphasis should be given to expectations of the patient and their family through appropriate psychoeducation and enhanced understanding and partnership.

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