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The impact of ketogenic diet on the onset and progression of multiple sclerosis.

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by inflammation and neurodegeneration. Current research suggests that diet may influence disease course, severity of symptoms, and quality of life in MS patients. The ketogenic diet (KD) has been used for more than a century as a therapeutic approach for various medical conditions. It was originally developed in the 1920s as a treatment option for epilepsy, and especially in the last 30 years, has gained popularity for its potential benefits in a variety of neurological conditions other than epilepsy. This prompted us to perform a literature survey regarding the effect of KD on the onset and progression of MS. The here reviewed 15 original research articles including in vitro, preclinical, and clinical studies provide evidence for the safety and feasibility of the KD in MS, showing potential neuroprotective effects and positive impacts on cellular metabolism and disease outcome. Since the literature is limited and most studies were conducted with low numbers of MS patients and rather exploratory in nature, further studies with larger cohorts are needed to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms by which the improvements of the MS disease course are achieved.

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