Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Circulating Plasma miR-122 and miR-583 Levels Are Involved in Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Pathogenesis and Serve As Novel Diagnostic Biomarkers.

Background: MicroRNAs regulate many biological processes and are involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases including chronic hepatitis B (CHB). Moreover, besides investigation of their roles in hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, a noninvasive, sensitive, and specific biomarker is essential in the diagnosis of liver diseases. This study was designed to evaluate the role of miR-122, miR-583, and miR-24 in the pathogenesis of CHB both in active chronic hepatitis (ACH) patients and in inactive carriers (IC). Materials and Methods: Plasma samples and all relevant clinical features were collected from 43 patients with CHB (28 ACH and 15 IC) and 43 healthy controls. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to detect the plasma levels of miR-122, miR-583, and miR-24. Results: Results show miR-122 ( p  = 0.0001) and miR-583 ( p  = 0.006) but not miR-24 ( p  = 0.65) were upregulated in patients with CHB versus the control group. Interestingly, there was a significant increase in the plasma expression of miR-583 in IC versus ACH. Moreover, receiver operating characteristic curve analysis determined plasma levels of miR-122 (area under the ROC curve [AUC] = 0.89, p  < 0.0001, sensitivity: 100%, specificity: 62.5%) and miR-583 (AUC = 0.71, p  = 0.0007, sensitivity: 90%, specificity: 47.62%) as sensitive biomarkers to discriminate CHB patients from controls. Conclusion: Our data showed an increase in the plasma levels of miR-583 in IC versus ACH patients. Moreover, we demonstrated that miR-122 and miR-583 may serve as potential biomarkers for CHB diagnosis and activity.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app