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Comparison of survival by vasoactive-inotropic score in patients receiving veno-arterial extracorporeal life support.

After the initiation of veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (V-A ECMO) for hemodynamic support, patients often require vasopressor and inotropic medications to support their blood pressure and cardiac contractility. The vasoactive-inotropic score (VIS) is a standardized calculation of vasopressor and inotrope equivalence, which uses coefficients for each medication to calculate a total value. This study evaluated the association between the 30-day survival of patients receiving V-A ECMO support and the VIS calculated 24 h after ECMO cannulation (VIS24). This was a single-center, retrospective, observational cohort study. The median VIS24 of the entire cohort was 6.0, and was determined as a cutoff for comparison. Patients with a VIS24 < 6.0 were assigned to a group, and those with a VIS24 ≥ 6.0 were assigned to a second group. Patients with a VIS24 < 6.0 had higher 30-day survival than those with a VIS24 ≥ 6.0 (54.5% vs 41.4%; p  = 0.03). The group with a VIS24 < 6.0 also had significantly improved survival to decannulation of ECMO support; however, there was no difference in the survival to hospital discharge. We conducted a secondary analysis of quartiles and determined that individuals with a VIS24 > 11.4 had the lowest survival in the cohort. This finding may help identify patients with the lowest probability of 30-day survival in those receiving V-A ECMO for hemodynamic support.

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