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Profiles and Outcomes of Skin Injuries Caused by Injectable Drug Extravasation: An Analysis of the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report Database.

Extravasation occurs when injectable drugs leak out of the blood vessels, damaging the surrounding tissues and causing a variety of skin injuries. This study aimed to comprehensively analyze extravasation risk, skin injury profiles, and outcomes for suspect drugs from the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER) database. Adverse events were defined according to the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities/Japanese version; the term extravasation (Standardized MedDRA Query Code: 20000136) was used in this analysis. The names of adverse events were entered as unified preferred terms and redefined to evaluate skin injury profiles. In addition, skin injury outcomes were divided into 2 broad categories: "improvement" and "no improvement." Reporting odds ratios were used to detect signals for adverse events. A total of 656 cases of extravasation-related adverse events were reported between April 2004 and January 2022. Signals for extravasation-related adverse events were detected from 11 drugs. Then, their respective skin injury profiles and outcomes were determined. These results suggest a relationship between adverse events associated with extravasation and 11 drugs and identify the characteristics of each skin injury and their outcomes. These findings will contribute to improving the quality of infusion management in clinical practice.

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