Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

The Role of BDNF and NPY Levels, Effects of Behavioral Systems and Emotion Regulation on Internet Addiction in Adolescents.

Psychiatric Quarterly 2023 August 24
Internet addiction (IA), one of the behavioral addictions, is also related to impulsivity. Although studies on its etiology and risks continue, the number of studies is limited. In this study, we aimed to assess the roles of behavioral systems, emotional regulation (ER), and impulsivity in the development of IA in adolescents and also to assess the relationship between all these clinical parameters and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neuropeptide Y (NPY). Forty-two adolescents with IA and 30 healthy controls (ages 12 -17) were included in the study. Self-reported measures included the Internet Addiction Scale. (IAS), Behavioral Activation and Behavioral Inhibition Scale (BAS/BIS), Barratt. Impulsiveness Scale-11 (BIS-11), and Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale-16 (DERS-16) were used for the assessment of the participants. The levels of plasma brain BDNF and NPY were evaluated with the ELISA method. BAS/BIS subscale scores, BIS-11, and DERS-16 scale total scores were found to be statistically significantly higher, while BDNF and NPY levels were found to be lower in adolescents with IA compared to the healthy controls. IA severity was not found to correlate with both BDNF and NPY. IA was found to be more related to BIS than to BAS. There is a need for further studies evaluating developmental features and possible diagnostic biomarkers that may be associated with IA in adolescents.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app