Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

New Directions in Child Psychiatry: Shaping Neurodevelopmental Trajectories.

Historically, the field of child psychiatry has lagged behind the field of general psychiatry in terms of research innovations and the availability of empirically supported treatment modalities. However, over the last two decades there has been increasing interest in and research focused on the developmental origins of mental disorders examining both neurobiological and psychosocial etiologies.1 This has catalyzed the field leading to advances in understanding the developmental psychopathology of mental disorders and the generation of novel early interventions that have shown significant promise.2-4 Further, catalyzing this effort is new data demonstrating the powerful impact of psychosocial forces on neurodevelopment. New methodologies and discoveries in the basic areas of early childhood developmental psychology have led to a greater appreciation for the emotional and cognitive sophistication of children in the first three years of life. Advances in methods to understand preverbal children's emotional and attentional responses (through measures of eye gaze and suck for example) as well as observational methods to glean a variety of mental health relevant behaviors early in life (e.g. behavioral inhibition, pro-social behaviors and social motivation) have further elucidated and validated these capacities. In addition, measures of neural function using electroencephalogram and evoked response potentials (EEG/ERP) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) as early as the neonatal period, with many analysis methods developed at WUSTL, have further informed this domain providing new insight into early brain and behavioral relationships as well as how intervention impact brain function.5-7.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app