JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
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Current Knowledge About the Impact of Maternal and Infant Nutrition on the Development of the Microbiota-Gut-Brain Axis.

The prenatal and early postnatal periods are stages during which dynamic changes and the development of the brain and gut microbiota occur, and nutrition is one of the most important modifiable factors that influences this process. Given the bidirectional cross talk between the gut microbiota and the brain through the microbiota-gut-brain axis (MGBA), there is growing interest in evaluating the potential effects of nutritional interventions administered during these critical developmental windows on gut microbiota composition and function and their association with neurodevelopmental outcomes. We review recent preclinical and clinical evidence from animal studies and infant/child populations. Although further research is needed, growing evidence suggests that different functional nutrients affect the establishment and development of the microbiota-gut-brain axis and could have preventive and therapeutic use in the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. Therefore, more in-depth knowledge regarding the effect of nutrition on the MGBA during critical developmental windows may enable the prevention of later neurocognitive and behavioral disorders and allow the establishment of individualized nutrition-based programs that can be used from the prenatal to the early and middle stages of life.

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