Journal Article
Observational Study
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Risk of Cardiovascular Diseases Among Different Metabolic Obesity Phenotypes: A Prospective Observational Study.

Objectives: Various diseases are associated with obesity and metabolism. We sought to investigate the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in diverse metabolic obesity phenotypes. Methods and Results: A prospective observational study of 1517 participants ≥25 years of age without CVD at baseline was conducted. Participants were categorized into four groups based on the condition of central obesity and metabolic health status: metabolically healthy normal weight, metabolically healthy obesity (MHO), metabolically unhealthy normal weight, and metabolically unhealthy obese (MUO). A multivariate Cox regression analysis was used to analyze the relationship between different obesity phenotypes and CVD. During 14830.49 person-years of follow-up, there were 244 incident cases of CVD. Of the 1517 participants, 72 (4.75%) and 812 (53.53%) were classified as having MHO and MUO, respectively. MHO and MUO had a tendency toward a higher risk of CVD [adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) = 1.49, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11-2.02 and HR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.00-1.55, respectively] based on the waist circumference criterion. Conclusion: MHO and MUO can increase the risk of CVD.

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