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Dioscin ameliorates doxorubicin-induced heart failure via inhibiting autophagy and apoptosis by controlling the PDK1-mediated Akt/mTOR signaling pathway.

Heart failure (HF) is a disease with high mortality and morbidity rate. Autophagy is critically implicated in HF progression. The current research was designed to investigate the function of Dioscin on oxidative stress, autophagy, and apoptosis in HF. In this study, doxorubicin (Dox) was employed to induce HF model and HL-1 cell damage model. Echocardiography implied that Dioscin could dramatically relieve heart function in vivo. Western blotting determined that Dioscin treatment reversed the promotive effect of autophagy caused by Dox through modulating levels of key autophagy-associated molecules, including Atg5 and Beclin1. Dioscin also impaired apoptosis by regulating apoptosis-related protein, including Bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-3 following Dox treatment in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, the impacts of Dioscin were mediated by upregulation of PDK1-mediated Akt/mTOR signaling. The mTOR inhibitor (rapamycin) could counteract the therapeutic impact of Dioscin in vitro. Taken together, Dioscin could relieve cardiac function through blocking apoptosis and autophagy by activating the PDK1-elicited Akt/mTOR pathway.

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