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Streamlined quantitative BOLD for detecting visual stimulus-induced changes in oxygen extraction fraction in healthy participants: toward clinical application in human glioma.

Magma 2023 August 10
OBJECTIVE: Monitoring brain oxygenation is critical in brain tumors, as low oxygenation influences tumor growth, pathological angiogenesis, and treatment resistance. This study examined the ability of the streamlined quantitative (sq)BOLD MRI technique to detect oxygenation changes in healthy individuals, as well as its potential application in a clinical setting.

METHODS: We used the asymmetric spin echo (ASE) technique with FLAIR preparation, along with model-based Bayesian inference to quantify the reversible transverse relaxation rate (R2 ' ) and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) across the brain at baseline and during visual stimulation in eight healthy participants at 3T; and two patients with glioma at rest only.

RESULTS: Comparing sqBOLD-derived parameters between baseline and visual stimulation revealed a decrease in OEF from 0.56 ± 0.09 at baseline to 0.54 ± 0.07 at the activated state (p = 0.04, paired t test) within a functional localizer-defined volume of interest, and a decline in R2 ' from 6.5 ± 1.3s-1 at baseline to 6.2 ± 1.4s-1 at the activated state (p = 0.006, paired t test) in the visual cortex.

CONCLUSION: The sqBOLD technique is sensitive enough to detect and quantify changes in oxygenation in the healthy brain and shows potential for integration into clinical settings to provide valuable information on oxygenation in glioma.

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