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Dual-NIR wavelength (pulsed 810 nm and superpulsed 904 nm lasers) photobiomodulation therapy synergistically augments full-thickness burn wound healing: A non-invasive approach.

A thermal burn is the most frequent, distressing form of trauma. Globally, there is a critical necessity to explore novel therapeutic strategies for burn wound care. Combination therapy has marked therapeutic efficacy in positively regulating various phases of wound repair. Photobiomodulation (PBM) is a biophysical, non-thermal therapeutic healing modality to treat chronic non-healing wounds. It hypothesized that PBM using combined NIR wavelengths may absorb through different cellular photoacceptors with varying degrees of tissue penetration, which can potentially regulate the pace of healing. Therefore, the current study investigates the efficacy of dual-NIR wavelength treatment employing pulsed 810 nm and superpulsed 904 nm lasers PBM on transdermal burn repair in rats and unveils the associated molecular mechanistic insights. Rats were randomized into five groups: uninjured skin, burn control (sham-exposed), standalone treatment with pulsed 810 nm laser, superpulsed 904 nm laser, and dual combination groups. The present findings revealed that PBM with dual-NIR wavelength synergistically augmented burn wound healing compared to control and standalone treatments. The efficacy of combined treatment was exhibited by significantly enhanced wound area contraction (α-smooth muscle actin), proliferation (PCNA, cytokeratin-14, TGF-β2), angiogenesis (HIF-1α, CD31), ECM accumulation/ organization (collagen type 3, fibronectin), dermal hydration (AQP3), calcium homeostasis (TRPV3, calmodulin), and bioenergetics activation (CCO, AMPK-α, ATP). Collectively, PBM with dual-NIR wavelength (pulsed/ superpulsed-mode) treatment accelerates full-thickness burn wound healing, which could be used as a non-invasive translational approach in clinical significance in conjunction with existing burn wound care management.

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