Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

CPT2-mediated fatty acid oxidation inhibits tumorigenesis and enhances sorafenib sensitivity via the ROS/PPARγ/NF-κB pathway in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

Cellular Signalling 2023 August 3
Kidney cancer is a common kind of tumor with approximately 400,000 new diagnoses each year. Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) accounts for 70-80% of all renal cell carcinomas. Lipid metabolism disorder is a hallmark of ccRCC. With a better knowledge of the importance of fatty acid oxidation (FAO) in cancer, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2) has gained prominence as a major mediator in the cancer metabolic pathway. However, the biological functions and mechanism of CPT2 in the progression of ccRCC are still unclear. Herein, we performed assays in vitro and in vivo to explore CPT2 functions in ccRCC. Moreover, we discovered that CPT2 induced FAO, which inhibited the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by increasing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) production. Additionally, we demonstrated that CPT2 suppresses tumor proliferation, invasion, and migration by inhibiting the ROS/ PPARγ /NF-κB pathway. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and drug sensitivity analysis showed that high expression of CPT2 in ccRCC was associated with higher sorafenib sensitivity, which was also validated in vitro and in vivo. In summary, our results suggest that CPT2 acts as a tumor suppressor in the development of ccRCC through the ROS/PPARγ/NF-κB pathway. Moreover, CPT2 is a potential therapeutic target for increasing sorafenib sensitivity in ccRCC.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app