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Reducing older people's risk of fraud victimization through an anti-scam board game.

This study adopted an experimental design to evaluate the effectiveness of an anti-scam education program for older adults. Participants in the experimental group ( n  = 55) first participated in an anti-scam board game and then joined another board game featuring local tea restaurants two weeks later, whereas such order was reversed for the control group ( n  = 54). Compared with the control group, participants in the experimental group reported significant increases in their self-efficacy in fraud prevention and awareness of scam situations, and a significant decrease in perceived susceptibility to scams immediately and two weeks after the intervention, demonstrating the immediate and the short-term effects of the anti-scam education program in reducing fraud victimization risk of older adults.

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