Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Mental Health Impact of COVID-19 Infection on Postpartum Women from Lower and Middle-income Backgrounds in India and its Effects on Early Mother-infant Bonding: An Observational Study.

The study was designed to examine the mental health impact of COVID-19 infection in postpartum women and its effects on mother-infant bonding during the first eight weeks postpartum. Fifty-seven consenting eligible postpartum women were recruited for the study. They were assessed at two time points using standardized rating scales to measure distress and uniquely designed scales assessing COVID-19-specific outcome fears and bonding. Almost half [42%] of postpartum women with COVID-19 suffered from a probable anxiety disorder, and one-third [33.3%] suffered from probable depression. The overwhelming majority [91.2%] experienced COVID-19-specific fear. There was an inverse relationship between one dimension of maternal caregiving and self-report depression and anxiety scores, respectively. Additionally, despite discharge, 25% of the mothers had not breastfed the infants till the 8th-week postpartum period, which is in discordance with the World Health Organization (WHO) recommendation of exclusive breastfeeding up to 6 months of age that is widely practiced in India. The novel COVID-19 pandemic was associated with anxiety and depression, impacting mother-infant bonding. Therefore, there is a need for specialized mental health services and individualized breastfeeding interventions for this vulnerable population to ensure positive outcomes.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app