Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Neurofilament Light Chain: A Translational Safety Biomarker for Drug-Induced Peripheral Neurotoxicity.

Branaplam is a splicing modulator previously under development as a therapeutic agent for Spinal Muscular Atrophy Type 1 and Huntington's disease. Branaplam increased the levels of survival motor neuron protein in preclinical studies and was well tolerated in early clinical studies; however, peripheral neurotoxicity was observed in a preclinical safety study in juvenile dogs. The aim of this study was to determine whether serum neurofilament light chain (NfL) concentrations in dogs could serve as a monitoring biomarker for branaplam-induced peripheral neurotoxicity. A 30-week time-course investigative study in dogs treated with vehicle control (negative control), neurotoxic pyridoxine (positive control), or branaplam was conducted to assess neuropathology, nerve morphometry, electrophysiological measurements, gene expression profiles, and correlation to NfL serum concentrations. In branaplam-treated animals, a mild to moderate nerve fiber degeneration was observed in peripheral nerves correlating with increased serum NfL concentrations, but there were no observed signs or changes in electrophysiological parameters. Dogs with pyridoxine-induced peripheral axonal degeneration displayed clinical signs and electrophysiological changes in addition to elevated serum NfL. This study suggests that NfL may be useful as an exploratory biomarker to assist in detecting and monitoring treatment-related peripheral nerve injury, with or without clinical signs, associated with administration of branaplam and other compounds bearing a neurotoxic risk.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app