Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Genome-Wide Association Studies for Albuminuria of non-Diabetic Taiwanese Population.

Background Chronic renal disease (CKD), defined by reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albuminuria, imposes huge health burden worldwide. Ethnicity-specific associations were frequently observed in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). In this research, we conducted GWAS of albuminuria in the non-diabetic population of Taiwan. Subjects and Methods Non-diabetic individuals aged 30 to 70 years and without cancer history were enrolled from the Taiwan Biobank. A total of 6,768 subjects received spot urine examination. After quality control with PLINK and imputation with SHAPEIT and IMPUTE2, a total of 3,638,350 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) remained for testing. SNPs with minor allele frequency low than 0.1% were excluded. We applied linear regression for analyzing associations between SNPs and log UACR. Results We identified six loci in or near the FCRL3 (P = 2.56 × 10-6), TMEM161(P = 4.43 × 10-6), EFCAB1 (P = 2.03 × 10-6), ELMOD1 (P = 2.97 × 10-6), RYR3 (P = 1.34 × 10-6), and PIEZO2 (P = 2.19 × 10-7) as candidate. Genetic variants in the FCRL3 gene that encodes a secretory IgA receptor were found to be associated with IgA nephropathy, which might manifest proteinuria. The PIEZO2 gene encodes a sensor for mechanical forces in mesangial cells and renin-producing cells. Conclusion We identified five new loci and one known suggestive loci for albuminuria in the non-diabetic Taiwanese population.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app