Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Immunohistochemistry versus PCR Technology for Molecular Subtyping of Breast Cancer: Multicentered Expereinces from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

The application of immunohistochemistry (IHC) for molecular characterization of breast cancer (BC) is of paramount importance; however, it is not universally standardized, subject to observer variability and quantifying is a challenge. An alternative molecular technology, such as endpoint reverse transcription (RT)-PCR gene expression analysis, may improve observer variability and diagnostic accuracy. This study was intended to compare IHC with the RT-PCR based technique and assess the potential of RT-PCR for molecular subtyping of BC. In this comparative cross-sectional study, 54 BC tissues were collected from three public hospitals in Addis Ababa and shipped to Gynaecology department at Martin-Luther University (Germany) for laboratory analysis. Only 41 samples were qualified for IHC and RT-PCR investigation of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and Ki-67 protein expression analysis. Kappa statistics was used to assess the concordance between the two techniques. The overall percent agreement between RT-PCR and IHC was 68.3% for ER (positive percent agreement [PPA] 71.1%; negative percent agreement [NPA] 33.3%), 39.0% for PR (PPA 14.3%; NPA 92.3%), and 82.9% for HER2 (PPA 62.5%; NPA 87.9%). Cohen's κ-values of 0.018 (< 0.20), 0.045 (< 0.200), and 0.481 (0.41-0.60) were generated for ER, PR, and HER2, respectively. Concordance for molecular subtypes was only 56.1% (23/41) and 0.20 kappa value. IHC and endpoint RT-PCR techniques have shown to be discordant for 43% samples. Molecular subtyping using endpoint RT-PCR was fairly concordant with IHC. Thus, endpoint RT-PCR may give an objective result, and can be applied for BC subtyping.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app