Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Stressful Life Events and Near-term Suicidal Risk in a Clinical Population.

The present study examined 22 specific stressful life events (SLEs) in relation to recent and prospective suicidal thoughts and behaviors (STBs). The effect of assessment method (self-report vs. chart-based ratings) and inpatient/outpatient status was also investigated. Past 3-month STBs and SLEs were assessed for 1,058 psychiatric patients; 696 completed one-month follow-up assessments. SLEs were common, with 684 participants (64.7%) reporting at least one. Total number of SLEs correlated with recent and prospective STB. A higher incidence of SLE's was found with self-report vs. chart-based measures (on 20 SLEs) and inpatients vs. outpatients (on 7 SLEs). SLEs of interpersonal rejection and loss, homelessness and academic failure offered elevated risk. In sum, SLEs are common and associated with STBs in psychiatric patients. SLEs of interpersonal rejection and loss, homelessness and academic failure may merit increased clinical attention.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app