Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Past antihypertensive medication use is associated with lower levels of small vessel disease and lower Aβ plaque stage in the brains of older individuals.

AIMS: This study assesses the association of antihypertensive medication use on the severities of neuropathological cerebrovascular disease (CVD excluding lobar infarction) in older individuals.

METHODS: Clinical and neuropathological data were retrieved for 149 autopsy cases >75 years old with or without CVD or Alzheimer's disease and no other neuropathological diagnoses. Clinical data included hypertension status, hypertension diagnosis, antihypertensive medication use, antihypertensive medication dose (where available) and clinical dementia rating (CDR). Neuropathological CVD severity was evaluated for differences with anti-hypertensive medication usage.

RESULTS: Antihypertensive medication use was associated with less severe white matter small vessel disease (SVD, mainly perivascular dilatation and rarefaction), with a 5.6 - 14.4 times greater likelihood of less severe SVD if medicated. No significant relationship was detected between infarction (presence, type, number & size), lacunes or cerebral amyloid angiopathy and antihypertensive medication use. Only increased white matter rarefaction/oedema and not perivascular dilation was associated with Alzheimer's pathology, with a 4.3 times greater likelihood of reduced Aβ progression through the brain if white matter rarefaction severity was none or mild. Antihypertensive medication use was associated with reduced Aβ progression but only in those with moderate to severe white matter SVD.

CONCLUSIONS: This histopathological study provides further evidence that antihypertensive medication use in older individuals is associated with white matter SVD and not with other CVD pathologies. This is mainly due to a reduction in white matter perivascular dilation and rarefaction/oedema. Even in those with moderate to severe white matter SVD, antihypertensive medication use reduced rarefaction and Aβ propagation through the brain.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app