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Effect of Peripherally Infused Norepinephrine on Reducing Central Venous Catheter Utilization.

The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the impact of peripherally administered norepinephrine on avoiding central venous catheter insertion while maintaining safety of the infusion. An institutional guideline allows peripheral infusion of norepinephrine via dedicated, 16- to 20-gauge, mid-to-upper arm intravenous (IV) catheters for up to 24 hours. The primary outcome was the need for central venous access in patients initially started on peripherally infused norepinephrine. A total of 124 patients were evaluated (98 initially on peripherally infused norepinephrine vs 26 with central catheter only administration). Thirty-six (37%) of the 98 patients who were started on peripheral norepinephrine avoided the need for central catheter placement, which was associated with $8,900 in direct supply cost avoidance. Eighty (82%) of the 98 patients who started peripherally infused norepinephrine required the vasopressor for ≤12 hours. No extravasation or local complications were observed in any of the 124 patients, regardless of site of infusion. Administration of norepinephrine via a dedicated peripheral IV site appears safe and may lead to a reduction in the need for subsequent central venous access. To achieve timely resuscitation goals, as well as to minimize complications associated with central access, initial peripheral administration should be considered for all patients.

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