Journal Article
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Processes triggered in guanine quadruplexes by direct absorption of UV radiation: From fundamental studies toward optoelectronic biosensors.

Guanine quadruplexes (GQs) are four-stranded DNA/RNA structures exhibiting an important polymorphism. During the past two decades, their study by time-resolved spectroscopy, from femtoseconds to milliseconds, associated to computational methods, shed light on the primary processes occurring when they absorb UV radiation. Quite recently, their utilization in label-free and dye-free biosensors was explored by a few groups. In view of such developments, this review discusses the outcomes of the fundamental studies that could contribute to the design of future optoelectronic biosensors using fluorescence or charge carriers stemming directly from GQs, without mediation of other molecules, as it is the currently the case. It explains how the excited state relaxation influences both the fluorescence intensity and the efficiency of low-energy photoionization, occurring via a complex mechanism. The corresponding quantum yields, determined with excitation at 266/267 nm, fall in the range of (3.0-9.5) × 10-4 and (3.2-9.2) × 10-3 , respectively. These values, significantly higher than the corresponding values found for duplexes, depend strongly on certain structural factors (molecularity, metal cations, peripheral bases, number of tetrads …) which intervene in the relaxation process. Accordingly, these features can be tuned to optimize the desired signal.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app