Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Men With Both Diabetes and a Family History of Diabetes Were Associated With Depressed Mood in Korean Adults.

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is strongly associated with depression, especially in women. This study was designed to investigate the gender-specific association between DM and depressive mood by family history of diabetes. Data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a population-based cross-sectional survey in 2020, were used. Of 6,133 participants aged 19 years or older, 4,259 participants were included after excluding participants without data of laboratory or physical examination, medical or family history of diseases, or depression scores of Patient Health Questionnaire-9. We examined associations of glucose and insulin metabolism, and DM with depressed mood by sex and family history of diabetes using logistic regression analyses with three stepwise models. In men, fasting glucose and HbA1c (odds ratio [OR]: 1.25, 95% confidence interval [CI]: [1.10, 1.42]) levels were significantly associated with depressed mood. Men with DM and a family history of diabetes were also significantly associated with depressed mood (OR: 1.84, 95% CI: [1.12, 3.05]), whereas DM without a family history showed no association. In women, glucose and insulin metabolism had no associations with depressed mood, and DM was also not associated with depressed mood regardless of a family history of diabetes. In Korean adults, DM with a family history of diabetes and glucose metabolism showed significant associations with depressed mood in men, but not in women. Our results suggest that men with both DM and a family history of diabetes should be paid more attention to depressed moods, considering ethnic characteristics.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app