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The Impact of Bacteriospermia on Semen Parameters Among Infertile Egyptian Men: A Case-Control Study.

This study aimed to detect the impact of bacteriospermia on semen parameters and sperm DNA fragmentation. This prospective case-control study was conducted over a period of 9 months. Samples were collected from andrology outpatient clinic attendants of Cairo University Hospitals. We enrolled 68 semen samples divided into two groups: a study group (34 semen samples with bacteriospermia) and a control group (34 semen samples without bacteriospermia). The characteristics of the semen, including morphology, motility, count, liquefaction, viscosity, pH, volume, and appearance, were evaluated according to the standard protocols. Patients with and without bacteriospermia had a comparable liquefaction time ( p = .343), semen appearance and color ( p = 1.00), semen pH ( p = 1.00), velocity ( p = .163), and total sperm count ( p = .451). Patients with bacteriospermia were associated with lower progressive motility ( p = .001), nonprogressive motility ( p = .032), total motility ( p = .001), and normal forms ( p = .001). The prevalence of abnormal semen analysis was 64.71% in the study group compared with 35.29% in the control group. Staphylococcus aureus (67.6%) and Escherichia coli (14.7%) were the most commonly detected organisms. Samples from which Methicilin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was isolated showed significant abnormalities in both progressive motility and normal morphology of sperm. Bacteriospermia has deteriorative effects on sperm quality parameters, such as semen volume, sperm motility, and sperm normal morphology.

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