Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Energy cost differences between marathon runners and soccer players: Constant versus shuttle running.

Purpose: In the last decades, the energy cost assessment provided new insight on shuttle or constant running as training modalities. No study, though, quantified the benefit of constant/shuttle running in soccer-players and runners. Therefore, the aim of this study was to clarify if marathon runners and soccer players present specific energy cost values related to their training experience performing constant and shuttle running. Methods: To this aim, eight runners (age 34 ± 7.30y; training experience 5.70 ± 0.84y) and eight soccer-players (age 18.38 ± 0.52y; training experience 5.75 ± 1.84y) were assessed randomly for 6' on shuttle-running or constant-running with 3 days of recovery in-between. For each condition, the blood lactate (BL) and the energy cost of constant (Cr ) and shuttle running (CSh ) was determined. To assess differences for metabolic demand in terms of Cr , CSh and BL over the two running conditions on the two groups a MANOVA was used. Results: V·O2max were 67.9 ± 4.5 and 56.8 ± 4.3 ml·min-1  kg-1 ( p = 0.0002) for marathon runners and soccer players, respectively. On constant running, the runners had a lower Cr compared to soccer players (3.86 ± 0.16 J kg-1 m-1 vs. 4.19 ± 0.26 J kg-1  m-1 ; F = 9.759, respectively; p = 0.007). On shuttle running, runners had a higher CSh compared to soccer players (8.66 ± 0.60 J kg-1  m-1 vs. 7.86 ± 0.51 J kg-1  m-1 ; F = 8.282, respectively; with p = 0.012). BL on constant running was lower in runners compared to soccer players (1.06 ± 0.07 mmol L-1 vs. 1.56 ± 0.42 mmol L-1 , respectively; with p = 0.005). Conversely, BL on shuttle running was higher in runners compared to soccer players 7.99 ± 1.49 mmol L-1 vs. 6.04 ± 1.69 mmol L-1 , respectively; with p = 0.028). Conclusion: The energy cost optimization on constant or shuttle running is strictly related to the sport practiced.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app