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Novel Insight into Ferroptosis in Kidney Diseases.

BACKGROUND: Various kidney diseases such as acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, polycystic kidney disease, renal cancer, and kidney stones, are an important part of the global burden, bringing a huge economic burden to people around the world. Ferroptosis is a type of nonapoptotic iron-dependent cell death caused by the excess of iron-dependent lipid peroxides and accompanied by abnormal iron metabolism and oxidative stress. Over the past few decades, several studies have shown that ferroptosis is associated with many types of kidney diseases. Studying the mechanism of ferroptosis and related agonists and inhibitors may provide new ideas and directions for the treatment of various kidney diseases.

SUMMARY: In this review, we discuss the differences between ferroptosis and other types of cell death such as apoptosis, necroptosis, pyroptosis, cuprotosis, pathophysiological features of the kidney, and ferroptosis-induced kidney injury. We also provide an overview of the molecular mechanisms involved in ferroptosis and events that lead to ferroptosis. Furthermore, we summarize the possible clinical applications of this mechanism among various kidney diseases.

KEY MESSAGE: The current research suggests that future therapeutic efforts to treat kidney ailments would benefit from a focus on ferroptosis.

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