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Highly sensitive, wide-pressure and low-frequency characterized pressure sensor based on piezoresistive-piezoelectric coupling effects in porous wood.

Carbohydrate Polymers 2023 September 2
Lightweight and highly compressible materials have received considerable attention in flexible pressure sensing devices. In this study, a series of porous woods (PWs) are produced by chemical removal of lignin and hemicellulose from natural wood by tuning treatment time from 0 to 15 h and extra oxidation through H2 O2 . The prepared PWs with apparent densities varying from 95.9 to 46.16 mg/cm3 tend to form a wave-shaped interwoven structure with improved compressibility (up to 91.89 % strain under 100 kPa). The sensor assembled from PW with treatment time of 12 h (PW-12) exhibits the optimal piezoresistive-piezoelectric coupling sensing properties. For the piezoresistive properties, it has high stress sensitivity of 15.14 kPa-1 , covering a wide linear working pressure range of 0.06-100 kPa. For its piezoelectric potential, PW-12 shows a sensitivity of 0.443 V·kPa-1 with ultralow frequency detection as low as 0.0028 Hz, and good cyclability over 60,000 cycles under 0.41 Hz. The nature-derived all-wood pressure sensor shows obvious superiority in the flexibility for power supply requirement. More importantly, it presents fully decoupled signals without cross-talks in the dual-sensing functionality. Sensor like this is capable of monitoring various dynamic human motions, making it an extremely promising candidate for the next generation artificial intelligence products.

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