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Impact of compressed sensing (CS) acceleration of two-dimensional (2D) flow sequences in clinical paediatric cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR).

Magma 2023 May 19
OBJECTIVES: Two-dimensional (2D) through-plane phase-contrast (PC) cine flow imaging assesses shunts and valve regurgitations in paediatric CMR and is considered the reference standard for Clinical quantification of blood Flow (COF). However, longer breath-holds (BH) can reduce compliance with possibly large respiratory manoeuvres altering flow. We hypothesize that reduced BH time by application of CS (Short BH quantification of Flow) (SBOF) retains accuracy while enabling faster, potentially more reliable flows. We investigate the variance between COF and SBOF cine flows.

METHODS: Main pulmonary artery (MPA) and sinotubular junction (STJ) planes were acquired at 1.5 T in paediatric patients by COF and SBOF.

RESULTS: 21 patients (mean age 13.9, 10-17y) were enrolled. The BH times were COF mean 11.7 s (range 8.4-20.9 s) vs SBOF mean 6.5 s (min 3.6-9.1 s). The differences and 95% CI between the COF and SBOF flows were LVSV -1.43 ± 13.6(ml/beat), LVCO 0.16 ± 1.35(l/min) and RVSV 2.95 ± 12.3(ml/beat), RVCO 0.27 ± 0.96(l/min), QP/QS were SV 0.04 ± 0.19, CO 0.02 ± 0.23. Variability between COF and SBOF did not exceed intrasession variation of COF.

CONCLUSION: SBOF reduces breath-hold duration to 56% of COF. RV flow by SBOF was biased compared to COF. The variation (95% CI) between COF and SBOF was similar to the COF intrasession test-retest 95% CI.

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