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Impact Strength of Various Types of Acrylic Resin: An In Vitro Study.

AIM: The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare the impact strength of conventional acrylic resin, high-impact acrylic resin, high-impact acrylic resin reinforced with silver nanoparticles, and high-impact acrylic resin reinforced with a zirconium oxide powder.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 60 samples were prepared of dimensions 60 mm length × 7 mm width × 4 mm thickness to test impact strength. Machined stainless steel dies of the same dimension were used to form molds for the fabrication of these samples. Of 60 samples, 15 samples were prepared each from conventional acrylic resin (Group A1), high-impact acrylic resin (Group A2), acrylic resin reinforced with silver nanoparticles (Group A3), and acrylic resin reinforced with zirconium oxide powder (Group A4). Izod-Charpy pendulum impact testing machine was used.

RESULTS: The impact strength of group A1 was in the range of 2.83-3.30 kJ/m2 ( M = 3.12 kJ/m2 , SD = 0.16), group A2 was in range of 5.10-5.78 kJ/m2 ( M = 5.51 kJ/m2 , SD = 0.18), group A3 was in range 3.18-3.56 kJ/m2 ( M = 3.37 kJ/m2 , SD = 0.11), and group A4 was in range 7.18-7.78 kJ/m2 ( M = 7.5 kJ/m2 , SD = 0.18). Statistical analysis using one-way ANOVA and t -test revealed significant differences ( p < 0.001).

CONCLUSION: High-impact acrylic resin reinforced with zirconium oxide powder has the highest impact strength.

CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: This research sheds light on the usefulness of novel filler materials in clinical prosthodontics.

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